Spring 2013

WILD GOOSE POETRY REVIEW
SPRING 2013

You will want to spend a lot of time with this issue of Wild Goose Poetry Review. It is rich, diverse, and has more “links” between poems and even between reviews and poems that can possibly be appreciated in a single reading.

I usually like to begin each issue with the poem that is my personal favorite in the issue. This time I had no fewer than 9 poems I wanted to start with. So that didn’t work.

Then, I usually like to arrange the poems that follow so that they are thematically linked from one to the next, creating a sort of over-arching narrative or at least some sense of progression. That was impossible this time. Yes, I have arranged several “connected” poems so that they are contiguous, but the range of topics addressed by poets whose work was too strong for me not to include multiple poems, made any coherent beginning-to-end arrangement impossible.

So, the best way to approach this issue is slowly and repeatedly, letting the poems wash over you and letting the links between them arise subtly and organically.

This is one of the largest issues we have had, with 32 poems by 23 poets, and 7 reviews by 5 different reviewers. Many of the poets are familiar to Wild Goose readers (Ronald Moran, Helen Losse, and others). Many are new (Phebe Davidson, Julia Nunnally Duncan, and others). Some are being published for the first time anywhere (Akacia Robinson, Donna Engel). Some of the reviewers are also new to the task (Mel Hager, Betty O’Hearn). Some of the reviewer also have poems included (Davidson and O’Hearn). And one of the poets reviewed also has poems in the issue (Dacey).

All of it makes for an interesting opportunity to compare and contrast forms, styles, what different poets have to say about similar topics, and what poets and critics believe make up good poetry today. I hope you enjoy reading them as much as I have, and I hope that you will join the conversation by leaving your comments for the poets, reviewers, and other readers to consider.

Contents
Louise McKinney, Tell It Long-Story-Short
Sharyl Collin, Break
Julia Nunnally Duncan, Politics
Phebe Davidson, Rain Crows
Phebe Davidson, Prairie Wife
Phillip Dacey, New York Requiem
Phillip Dacey, The Couple
Holly Day, All the Days After
Kelly DeMaegd, Entering Death with Open Eyes
Kelly DeMaegd, You Wouldn’t Know
Robin Richstone, The Bath
Robin Richstone, The Accidental Metaphor
Akacia Robinson, Defining Moments
Kathrin H. Rudland, Repository
Kathrin H. Rudland, Iluliaq
Kathrin H. Rudland, Murmurations
Alarie Tennille, Dali’s Clocks
Joseph Trombatore, 11:33 A.M. Poem
Douglas McHargue, On the Last Day of the World
Douglas McHargue, Saturday’s April
Lois Marie Harrod, The Shop Teacher
Ronald Moran, Legacy of a Coach
Ronald Moran, After Reading a Novel Where the Women Fantasize about a Hunk on TV
Ronald Moran, The Final Reading
Donna Engel, Candy
Sam Silva, A Different Kind of Nature
Helen Losse, Who Is the Man
Joan M. Howard, Today
Glenda Beall, A Balmy Day in January
Patricia Cole, Under Eaves
Jean Rodenbough, Katie Sings to the Neighborhood
Betty O’Hearn, Visits from Wanda

Reviews
Phebe Davidson, Review of Lynn Ciesielski’s “I Speak in Tongues”
Phebe Davidson, Review of Harry Calhoun’s “How Love Conquers the World” and “Maintenance and Death”
Phebe Davidson, Review of Kathy Nelson’s “Cattails”
Melissa Hager, Review of Karla Linn Merrifield’s “Lithic Scatter and Other Poems”
Patricia Deaton, Review of Keith Flynn’s “Colony Collapse Disorder”
Jessie Carty, Review of Jeannine Hall Gailey’s “Unexplained Fevers”
Betty O’Hearn, Review of Phillip Dacey’s “Gimme Five”

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